RAID Log

Tools | By Duncan Haughey | minute read

RAID on a blackboard with coloured chalk handwriting

A RAID log is one of the easiest and most effective tools you can create for your project.

It is a good idea to create a RAID log at the start of each project so you can track anything impacting you now or in the future. Keep your log up-to-date through weekly reviews and team meetings.

The acronym RAID stands for Risks, Assumptions, Issues and Dependencies.

Risks

Events that will harm your project if they occur. Risk refers to the combined likelihood the event will occur and the impact on the project if it does occur. If the probability of an event happening and the impact on the project are high, then identify the event as a risk. The log includes descriptions of each risk, a complete analysis and a plan to mitigate them.

Assumptions

Any factors that you are assuming to be in place will contribute to your project's successful result. The log includes details of the assumption, its reason, and the action needed to confirm whether the assumption is valid.

Issues

Something that is going wrong on your project and needs managing. Failure to manage issues may result in poor delivery or even complete loss. The log includes descriptions of each issue, its impact, seriousness, and actions needed to contain and remove it.

Dependencies

Any event or work that is either dependent on your project's result or on which your project will depend. The log captures whom you are dependent on, what should be delivered and when. It may also include who is dependent on you.

Act swiftly and decisively to deal with any risks or issues identified. Check your assumptions are valid and understand your dependencies.

You can create a simple RAID Log using a spreadsheet with one tab for each area. Use it as a primary source for your status reporting.

Using a RAID log is better than trying to keep all this information in your head.


Download our RAID Log Template


Recommended read: 10 Golden Rules of Project Risk Management by Bart Jutte.

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